Tag Archives: Funny

Frickin Dangerous Bro | They’re Frickin Funny Though

If y’all are avid readers of our website/blog/whatever, y’all will know of Frickin Dangerous Bro, but this time you’ll know a bit more about them from me! We caught one of their Frickin Dangerous World Tour of Tāmaki Makaurau shows in Glen Innes at Te Oro.

Honestly, one of the best things I found about Frickin Dangerous Bro is their interaction with the crowd. Y’know how there are comedians who are mean to the audience? Well Jamaine, James and Pax aren’t like those other comedians who gotta belittle, harrass or embarrass their audience to get some authentic laughs. They’re funny without being mean, and that’s pretty cool.

Frickin Dangerous Bro’s sketches offer some on point social commentary.

I like that it wasn’t preachy, but also doesn’t overstep into being offensive for no reason- I for one am genuinely sick of unapologetically problematic comedians.

It’s refreshing and relatable ya know?

Although the crux of their shows are sketches, they manage to improvise and make other jokes.

Not even joking, they kicked off their show and had to restart three times because Jamaine wanted to mock the late comers (dw, it wasn’t in a rude way okay). The swearing was minimal and it could’ve been because of the 8 year old in the front row, or maybe they know that you don’t have to be crude to be funny as f%^&.

Please, go check out their show. Watch them mock and destroy stereotypes, and get turnt tf up. Also, they’re sponsored by Sprite sooooo they’re a pretty big deal.

Catch their shows that are $15 a ticket- but hurry y’all!! Before they raise the prices to $30 because they’re worth AT LEAST that much and also the seats are limited! I think y’all can also get a selfie at the end!!

September 30th – Birkenhead College, Northshore

October 6th – Mangere Arts Centre – Ngā Tohu o Uenuku, Mangere

October 14th – New Lynn

October 21st – Q, Auckland CBD

Get more information here on their Facebook page.

 

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James, Motu, Jamaine, Mata and Pax. Jamaine said I’ve got jokes sooooo that basically means- catch me in the next show??? sk- just them. Source: FDB’s Facebook Page

Mata’s mentions:

Because you just can’t escape me.

  • The boys run the risk of over playing their sketches, too much of a good thing- you know? But nah I still pa’d my aka (you know if you translate that literally it means popped my laugh- but um a sensible translation would be ‘cracked up’) and I’ve seen a few of those sketches a few times
  • Comedic timing on point- even the adlibs lol
  • 4.5 Jawkwardlols out of 5 … they lost out on a .5 because- okay there’s no real reason tbh.

 

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Nish Kumar | Back With A New Show Review

Nish Kumar’s (no relation to JawkwardLOL’s Jess Kumar) show at the Civic this Comedy Fest has enough polysyllabic words to make you feel like a real intellectual when you can keep up. Yeah, take that everyone who said my undergraduate English Lit and Political Studies double major arts degree would go to waste.

He’s well-researched, well-presented and despite a few outbursts rather polite. Sounds more like a guest lecturer than a comedian, but for real he’s pretty hilarious.

Don’t be alarmed, he may use big words but his jokes aren’t so overly complicated that you miss the punchline because you’re too busy trying to make sense of it.

Kumar takes some difficult topics, like ethnic divides, gentrification (Jess’s favourite topic/buzzword ever), existential crisis, and colonialism, and relays his thoughts on them in a witty way that doesn’t alienate his audience.

Even if he’s talking about how if a white British guy turned up in a country, everyone there who wasn’t white were screwed…to a room full of white people. He’s not confrontational, but he’s prone to political rants that walk a tightrope between hilarious and hard-hitting.

However at some point he forgets a primer for a closing joke that he deftly (questionable) manages to work back in in order to close the show with somewhat off on a high. Was it on purpose? We don’t know, maybe? But if it didn’t slow the momentum of his show down then sure, some might say it was an avant-garde way of anticipating and quelling a lull.

Random thoughts during the show:

  • Jess is definitely the drummer from Coldplay- that’s why she’s so money ballin’.
  • Must remember the name of the documentary – damn it something…forgotten. But seriously if you’re reading this and can remember the name of the documentary he talked about, please tell me.
  • Hmmm are hipsters a trend? More a fad, no? (Here’s that one postgrad class on popular culture kicking in.) Unless it has lasting effects on culture it isn’t a trend- it’s a fad. Kik, bebo and myspace? Fads. Social media? Trend- because it’s a fundamental change on how we communicate. But Hipsters well- crap I missed a joke, OR the name of that documentary- either way I lose- I gotta stop having boring internal monologues like this.
  • I was too drop sacks to whoop when he said long reads, but I get down to long reads. I’m all about that long-form journalism. It’s what I do for a living, after all.
  • Shit that was funny and pretty enlightening- everyone should get to one of his shows.

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BACK WITH A NEW SHOW

WHEN: Sat 23, Tue 26 to Sat 30 Apr, Tue 3 to Sat 7 May
WHERE: The Classic, Auckland
GET TICKETSTicketek
TICKET PRICES:

Monday – Thursday $25.00
Friday & Saturday $30.00

*service fee may apply

 

 

Frickin Dangerous Bro | G.O.A.T Review

Frickin Dangerous Bro, or rather ‘three brown guys who make funny’ (my words, not theirs), the sketch-comedy trio comprised of Jamaine Ross, James Roque & Pax Assadi started their G.O.A.T (Greatest Of All Time) comedy fest show off with a bang at the Basement Studio.

The premise is simple enough, three guys on stage performing live sketch comedy written by themselves for an hour. They’ve got props, excellent scene-setting music and of course themselves.

Does it all work like a well-oiled machine? No.

But is it funny? Heck yeah.

Sure they may have rehearsed but the only way in which that comes across is when they get a sketch going they know what’s happening in that sketch.

Otherwise you’ve got them checking their own set list and helping each other remember next lines should they be forgot. And expect a a fair few forgotten lines, missed cues, character breaks and mistakes, friends.

It’s all part of the charm of the show, they bounce off each other and off the audience and daaaamn it’s lucky they’re quick-witted or the audience might not have let them survive. Especially Assadi and Roque who manage to shut down a heckler without coming off as onstage bullies ha. Ross is caught between calling the other two out and not wanting to be excluded from their fun.

Their different personalities make for good group dynamics, both when bantering with the crowd, each other and during their skits.

The skits range from slice-of-life type storylines to wtf-did-I-just-watch type storylines. While I wouldn’t say the writing is altogether solid, jokes (which often work by subverting stereotypes and messing with what’s expected) do hit their mark if sometimes get stretched a bit thin and repeated a few too many times.

But through it all you’re frickin’ laughing and that’s all that frickin’ matters.

Random thoughts during the show: 

  • Lol I can count how many brown people I see in the crowd on one hand.
  • The ‘We like Billy T’ lady had the most perfect timing of the evening tbh I’d go to another show just to see if another audience member tops her- and also because the show’s hilarious and I doubt each night will be completely the same.
  • Is that an Avondale College tie?
  • Not for nothing but one of my favourite sketch comedy makers are the Laughing Samoans… just saying, for no reason related to the show or anything. [Side eyes emoji.]

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FRICKIN DANGEROUS BRO

WHEN: April 23-Saturday April 30th 7.30pm (No shows 25th & 26th April 2016)
WHERE: Basement Studio
GET TICKETS: iTickets 
TICKET PRICES: 

Full Price $18.00
Concession $15.00
Group 4+ $15.00
Cheap Wednesday $14.40

*service fee may apply

Rose Matafeo | Valley of the Lols Review

Rose Matafeo has an hour of lols, in her Auckland show Valley of the Lols, for anyone interested this comedy fest. We loved the name, no matter the backstory.

The 24-year-old Matafeo’s set, full of a somewhat-prepared list of musings-disguised-lols, is delivered with all of the bravado of, well, Rose Matafeo.

She takes the audience, of which she banters with quite a bit, on a rollercoaster of anecdotal jokes that have an unpolished feel yet hit home each time. Jokes range from lols of singledom and loneliness to self-deprecation where you think- I hope she knows she’s not alone. Which is the beauty in the set, because she’s not alone- it’s why the jokes hit their mark each time.

To varying degrees people in the audience can empathise, or at the very least sympathise, with her stories which makes it easy to laugh at her jokes. I mean maybe we’re not butterchicken, or even a spicier curry, (see the show to get the reference) but at some point most of us have put our best faces forward when all we wanted to do is go home and lie in bed.

There’s a seasoned quality about the comedian that goes beyond her seeming comfort on the stage. It’s the comfort of someone who uses and exposes her own insecurities on stage so that people can laugh on a regular basis.

The comfort of someone who can con a crowd into feeling like at some point in their life they’ve experienced a similar thing and maybe they have, or maybe they haven’t but the point is the audience laughed.

To paraphrase and butcher German philosopher Nietzsche, Matafeo’s set could be described as staring into an abyss to find it staring right back atcha. And the longer you watched the more you laughed.

So was the hour a valley of lols? Yes, each joke whether aided by props and some ace music was delivered with the deadpanned way that pulls a laugh out of you whether you want it to or not.

And if that’s not what you want from a comedy show, what the bloody hell is wrong with you?

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VALLEY OF THE LOLS

WHEN: April 23-Saturday April 30th 7.30pm (No shows 25th & 26th April 2016)
WHERE: Basement Theatre
GET TICKETSiTickets
TICKET PRICES: 

Full Price $24.00
Concession $18.00
Group 6+ $20.00
Cheap Wednesday $19.20

*service fee may apply

 

 

 

Three Wise Cousins | Review

Film: Three Wise Cousins
Director: Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa aka S.Q.S

DVD’s Now Out: Order from MadMan NZ Entertainment!

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As Three Wise Cousins opens up in Hastings, Dunedin, and Palmerston North from today I figured I should write a review about the filmNot because I’m Samoan, or because it’s what everyone’s talking about, but because it’s good. Despite only being shown at a handful of cinemas across New Zealand the self-funded, grassroots, comedy has grossed about US$200,000 in the last two weeks.

And it’s about to head over across the ditch to Australia, with a Samoan premiere also set for the end of February.

The film has an engaging storyline, offers plenty of laughs, the characters are memorable, and there’s a universal message behind it that doesn’t just apply to Samoans or Pacific Islanders.

It follows a young New Zealand-born Samoan Adam (Neil Amituanai) as he heads to the motherland in an attempt to impress his crush Mary (Gloria Ofa Blake), who only likes “real” island guys.

In Samoa, Adam’s two cousins Mose and Tavita, played by actors with very little acting experience Vito Vito and Fesui Villiamu, put him through a Samoan boot camp. Under their tutelage Adam is seen trying to climb coconut trees, work the plantation and do all sorts of fe’aus (chores) Mose and Tavita do on a daily basis.

Adam has a bit of a culture shock, in more ways than one, but the lessons learnt don’t just apply to young NZ-born Samoans in the crowd, and should resonate with any young person in the audience.

Sure a couple of jokes will be a bit hit and miss, especially ones that may not have gotten any subtitles, but context will help those who can’t speak a word of Samoan out immensely.

The humour comes not just from a witty script but the way the actors seem to bounce well off of each other. The way certain scenes are juxtaposed and the revelations they bring with it are also hilarious.

However the film is not without touching moments that will, or should, make you appreciative of what you have, and perhaps want to do more for your family. Especially if Adam’s character resonates with you.

The film is cleverly shot, showcasing a beautiful Samoa and a slick-looking Auckland, but a few jump-cuts and panning shots could make you a bit dizzy. You’ve been warned.

Nevertheless this whirlwind of a comedy is set to entertain crowds for years to come. We give it FOUR and a HALF out of FIVE Silent (well, loud) LOLS.

Check out the trailer, but be warned it doesn’t do the film any justice:

Locations you can catch it at below:

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What We Do In The Shadows – Trailer & Clips

“Humans can never know what ve do in the shadows.”

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The vampire mockumentary, written and directed by Waititi and Flight of the Conchords’ Jemaine Clement, follows vampire flatmates Viago (Waititi), Deacon (Jonny Brugh), Vladislav (Clement) and Petyr living in a cruddy Welly flat. It premiered at the Sundance Film Fest where critics raved about it and, if the trailer and subsequent clips are anything to go by, for good reason becayse it looks hilarious. Check out the clips below, the film itself has an NZ release of June 19. Fangtastic.

 

 

NZ Comedy Festival – The 5pm Project

Last night I was sitting in the second row of the Rangatira at Q, waiting to laugh myself to tears. I, however did not. But not in a bad way! (I shouldn’t have begun this review that way. The show was a chill- instead of clutching your stomach in laughter, you chuckled quietly amongst each other at the remarks made on the stage.

Rose Matafeo, the host for the night, kicked off the show with good energy. Her engagement with the audience, or rather the two REALLY loud old people in the back and Isaac (an 8 year old who seemed completely infatuated with her) was entertaining to say the least. The slightly awkward, kinda creepy, and quirky Rose kept the crowd laughing with light, often self-deprecating humor, whilst prepping everyone for the next act.

Rhys Matthewson was first up, he had a lot of opinions on “important” things- which more or less had me laughing- albeit not in complete agreement with him. Matt Stellingwerf followed, bringing with him a laid back type of style with well-timed jokes and pop-culture references mixed with self-deprecation that seemed to go over well with the audience.

Steven Boyce came on next, his intro kind of dragged on- Hey Boyce, hey hey hey hello hi hey hi hi hi hi hello hey. It wasted about half of his stage time even if he managed to pull a few laughs. However he also offended every brown person within hearing distance. Like bro, that’s actually rude. And not a Ha-Ha rude, just a RUDE.

Joseph Moore was actually a bit of a delight, he made some rather apt observations about hip-hop lyrics and some improvements on New Zealand music. I do believe this NZ Music Month- NZ artists should take Moore’s advice in order to spice up their tracks. Also, I have a new appreciation for NZ reality TV shows about coast-line cops and fishing restrictions.

The closing act, Guy Williams, strutted onto the stage with a “What up, Pussies?” Earning him a lot of laughs and some…fangirling? At least from the twelvies in front of us. Guy’s dead-panned humour was a hit with the crowd and while we found it amusing we have a ‘Life Hack’ tip for Guy: Life Hacks on stage, while earning him points for audience engagement, doesn’t work as well as Life Hacks on radio.

All in all it was a good way to spend an ‘early evening’. Would recommend each comedian separately.